Archive for Black Star Project

10 Things All Young Black Men Should Know

Posted in African Americans, Black Interests, Black Men, Black Men In America with tags , , , on February 12, 2014 by Gary Johnson

Morehouse

By The Black Star Project

1)     Know that you are a young Black man in America and that means you are different than other Americans.  While you can still realize your dreams, you might have to take a different path.  You will have to be more careful, more thoughtful and more aware than others to survive in America.

2)      Value education, learning and reading.  The more and better you can read for understanding, the freer and more powerful you will become.

3)      Work hard.  Many times, it is not what you know that makes you successful, but instead consistency, persistence, effort and dedication.  Be sure to just “show up”.

4)      Respect women and girls.  They hold up half the sky in our communities.  Together we can accomplish great things in our families and communities.

5)      Believe in something higher than yourself.  Whether its religious, spiritual or philosophical, connect with and explore the larger universe and eternity.

6)      Emulate strong, positive, intelligent Black men.  Use them as your mentors and role models.

7)      Be a leader!  Exhibit courage, wisdom, vision and good decision-making skills to help your community improve.  You are a natural leader.  Others will follow your positive and righteous actions.

8)      Respect and work with other young Black men to accomplish great things for your community.  Teams of young Black men can accomplish what individuals cannot.

9)      Study your history and culture.  You are not alone, ever.

10)    Choose positive peers, associates and friends.  Those relationships will help determine your path in life.

Black Star Project

As the Executive Director of The Black Star Project, Phillip Jackson has become a national leader advocating for community involvement in education and the importance of parental development to ensure that children are properly educated. The Black Star Project has served close to 100,000 students in over 175 schools since 1996 in its Student Motivation Program and between 3,000 to 4,000 parents in its parent outreach programs since 2004. This year, Phillip Jackson and The Black Star Project lead the nation back to school with the hugely successful Million Father March 2005. This second annual back-to-school march encouraged men to take children to school on the first day, marking a commitment to a year of positive male involvement in education. Marches took place at schools in 82 cities around the country and even in Auckland, New Zealand.

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Black America Loses Gamble In Electing First Black President

Posted in Barack Obama, Black America, Black Interests, Black Men, Politics with tags , , , on February 13, 2010 by Gary Johnson

By Phillip Jackson

In 2008, black America placed most of its political capital, spiritual energy and financial resources into electing the first black president of the United States. Black community leaders – political, spiritual and media – led us to believe that electing a first black president was a natural extension of the civil rights movement.

They were wrong. In fact, electing the first black president might well have ended the civil rights movement. Black America mistakenly traded the future of its young black men for a black president.

Young black men in America are beyond living in a “state of emergency.” Many of them range from “barely surviving” to “no longer existing.” This tragedy can be seen in prisons and jails across America, where black men make up 50% to 80% of prison and jail populations although we are less than 7% of the total U.S. population.

Despair also can be seen in our families, where more than 70% of our children are born into single, female-headed households, and in colleges and universities, where black male populations on many major college campuses total a mere 1% to 3%.

Granted, these were all problems before the first black president took office; however, the bottom line is that this president has not committed himself in any way to directly address these issues.

In so many ways, the energy used to support a first black president was energy that should have been used to educate black children, rebuild black families and economically revitalize black communities. As a way of saving our struggling communities, black America took a gamble on supporting a first black president. But we lost.

Over and over, the black community has reached out for help from this first black president, and over and over, he has said, “No!” This first black president has been clear that his job is not to help black Americans but to help all Americans.

All Americans do not need the same help that young black men need. We need only walk down any city street in almost any predominantly African-American community to see residue of the human wreckage of millions of young black men nationwide.

Few leaders – those same political, spiritual and media leaders who advised us to campaign for this black president – engaged in proactive measures to prevent this “silent genocide.” The mass destruction of young black American men has been effectively ignored by almost everybody – the government, the media and much of the philanthropic community. And even most black faith leaders stand by and watch this preventable, ongoing, horrific loss of our young black men.

Too few of us are asking: Who are young black women going to marry? Who will be good fathers to tens of millions of black fatherless children? Who will anchor strong families in the black community? Who will build and maintain the economies of black communities? Who will young black boys emulate as they grow into men? Will black America be a viable and valuable community in 20 years?

This demise of black America is happening in front of our eyes because so few of us – black, white or other – really care about these young black men.

Electing America’s first black president seems to have cleansed the conscience of most Americans for destroying many past generations of black people. What a cruel hoax to believe that if a black man can become president, then young black men do not have any problems that America is obligated to address.

Correcting the problems of young black men in America will require a comprehensively structured, sufficiently financed, professionally managed, ethically led and committed multi-pronged effort to systemically address and shift the cascading negative outcomes for black men and boys. Simply telling black men to “man up” will not work.

The real shame of this catastrophe is not that America can’t save young black men; the shame is that America won’t make the effort to save young black men! Compared with massive government bailouts and frivolous expenditures, the resources required to save America’s young black men are minuscule. Saving young black men is an investment in America! A successful effort to save young black men must also address habits, attitudes and behaviors of these youth that have pushed them to the precipice of irrelevance, obsolescence and nonexistence.

To date, precious little has been put in place to stop the ongoing destruction and annihilation of young black men. When our first black president has been asked about helping black men in America, his retort, “I will do what is best for all Americans,” is woefully insufficient to address the endangered status of millions of black males in America.

The president must do the best for both, not just for America. In fact, doing what is best for young black men is what is best for America!

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Founded in 1996 by Phillip Jackson, The Black Star Project is committed to improving the quality of life in Black and Latino communities of Chicago and nationwide by eliminating the racial academic achievement gap.  Their mission is to provide educational services that help pre-school through college students succeed academically and become knowledgeable and productive citizens with the support of their parents, families, schools and communities.

Phillip Jackson

Executive Director

The Black Star Project

773.285.9600

Phillip Jackson is the Founder and Executive Director of The Black Star Project, based in Chicago.  Its mission is to improve the quality of life in black and Latino communities of Chicago and nationwide by eliminating the racial academic achievement gap.  You can e-mail Mr. Jackson at blackstar1000@ameritech.net.

The above text was excerpted from The Black Star Project Newsletters.  Click here to visit the official web site of The Black Star Project.

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