Archive for N Word

ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith: Great Voice Wrong Message: Fighting Against the NFL’s N-word Policy

Posted in Black Men, Sports News with tags , , , , on October 5, 2014 by Gary Johnson

Stephen-A-Smith

By H. Lewis Smith

During the course of a nationally-televised football game on September 14, 2014, the NFL’s San Francisco 49ers’ quarterback Colin Kaepernick called Chicago Bears’ defensive end Lamarr Houston the n-word (n**ga). It was then that a referee (who happened to be white) penalized Kaepernick for use of the vitriolic; the penalty resulted in an $11,025 fine.
On September 23, 2014, on national TV, ESPN’s First Take commentator Stephen A. Smith took issue with the policy. He presented an arousing and passionate response to the enforcement of the policy that he diametrically opposes. Smith feels it is okay for two African-American athletes to “trash talk” one another on the field, and if the term is spoken, then so be it. Smith argues that the rest of the world isn’t “sensitive” to how the athletes were raised and that, perhaps, in their neighborhoods and homes, the n-word was acceptable and a term of endearment.

Smith’s main point of concern, however, is that a white referee penalizing a black player for use of the n-word is egregious and offensive to him. Sadly, there are many who agree with him. Smith goes on to say that though he has deep respect for Mr. John B. Wooten, Chairman of the Fritz Pollard Alliance and the black man who spearheaded the movement for the NFL to adopt such a policy, he’s in complete disagreement with Wooten. He further attempts to paint a picture that the “older heads” (or older generation) including Mr. Wooten and others need to listen to the “younger heads” (or younger generation) such as himself and others when it comes to penalizing and fining NFL athletes for use of the n-word.

Moreover, although Smith seemed to have made a convicted argument as to why the n-word should not be a point of discussion or penalty, it needs to be pointed out that there are many capable and brilliant young heads who are not searching for pseudo-intellectual reasons to refer to themselves or any member of their race as n**ga. In fact, some young heads may have listened to that argument and heard nothing but ignorance spew from the mouth of a seemingly gifted speaker and well-educated African-American man. Some too may have immediately seen that Mr. Smith is a primary example of the systemic veiling of the populous, twisting of the black man’s mentality to continue to argue for inferiority, and the working of the very essence of the 400-year-old plight.

In “The Mis-Education of the Negro”, Dr. Carter G. Woodson said:
“If you can control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his action. When you determine what a man shall think you do not have to concern yourself about what he will do. If you make a man feel that he is inferior, you do not have to compel him to accept an inferior status, for he will seek it himself. If you make a man think that he is justly an outcast, you do not have to order him to the back door. He will go without being told; and if there is no back door, his very nature will demand one.”

Smith may believe that he represents the voice of the entire younger generation, but he does not. It is a known fact that many younger generation parents educate their children on the term and view it as a disrespectful profanity. The term is forbidden as everyday language in many Black households across America, and cannot be used—not even when one wants to use the term as so-called endearment or to cut down the confidence of anyone. Even further, many African-American children are taught to not only refrain from referring to anyone as such, but should also not allow anyone else to refer to them as such. Respect is a two-way street: it must be given and received.

To the contrary, Smith only represents that fraction of society that continues to lean in and remain shackled in the darkness. The ears of the enlightened have listened to that commentary and yelled at or argued back with the sentiments made. However, their voices simply cannot be heard because they do not have access to the news media to espouse their beliefs as does a Stephen A. Smith and some other proponents of the n-word (n**ga). And when they do share their views, they are considered troublemakers, too sensitive, or disillusioned; because they tend to be met with so much conflict from within and without the community, many times their arguments are suffocated or the cultural in-fighting takes center stage more so than the actual issue at hand.

Younger generation celebrities like Stephen A. Smith are to be applauded for their individual achievements; however, Black America’s paradigm should be to the commitment of the entire race’s preservation as a group, and not limited to the success of individuals, which unfortunately is the mindset of Black America. Until Black African Americans, as a group, can learn to separate themselves from the n-word the shackles of mental slavery will always remain intact.

Another thing: By saying the “young heads” vs. the “old heads”, Smith has promoted further separation within the Black community that is not going unseen—even Skip Bayless referred to this “cultural clash” within the Black community. The most unfortunate part is that, again, so long as the Black community remains divided, African Americans will never be able to re-unite, come together as a single being of force, and regain the cultural dignity and superior status divinely-granted upon the race. Instead, people like Smith continue to carry out the plight of White America ignorantly and unadulterated.
Now, truly, there is some agreement that a white-ruled NFL having to chastise black players for their use of the n-word is a bit brow-raising. The primary concern is that it should never have come to a white-run organization agreeing to help police the word if not for the Black community dropping the ball on this issue. Use of the n-word is a Black African-American issue, which should have been resolved within the community decades ago; instead, it has been allowed to fester.

By requiring the NFL or any other entity, organization or person outside of the Black community to regulate use of the n-word, smacks of paternalism. It is as if the Black community is unable to self-determine and self-regulate and, therefore, needs the white man to save them from themselves. Use of the degrading and demeaning term n**ga has grown far out of hand. In order for Black America to regain its full cultural respect and not have to expend its precious energy on such self-imposed issues—which in this case is really fighting over whose allowed to tell African Americans they cannot use the word (when NO ONE should need to be told because they should not be using the term in the first place), use of the term needs to be cut down dead in its tracks and buried by all.

Stephen A. Smith on a couple of occasions used the n-word on national TV and never got as much as a slap on the wrist for it. And as he openly evangelizes the support of the n-word, his spill is given full airtime—he’s allowed to go on this rampage campaigning for use of the n-word with not one cut or edit. Conversely, most recently when he slipped and used the word “provoke” relative to comments he was making about the Ray Rice case and domestic violence, white women were offended by it. As a consequence, Smith was suspended for seven days from his job.

But as Wooten goes on his rampage about using the n-word, Black America does or says nothing. However, Mr. Wooten recognized that, sadly, since the Black community refuses to address the matter themselves and hold all members within and without the community accountable to upholding and respecting Black Americans, he was required to approach the NFL to demand the respect many self-respecting Black Americans deserve. Had Mr. Wooten not taken this step, the blatant disrespect would have continued to fester at an even more severe rate. The reality is that Black America refuses to address the issue and does not want anyone else doing it either.

Unfortunately, Black America, collectively, just does not get it. The community refuses to remove the DO NOT DISTURB sign outside its door, refusing to WAKE UP.

Use of the n-word today is trans-generational and is the one and ONLY reason why the term still flows from the lips of contemporary Black African Americans. Black users of the term are allowing themselves to be defined by a racist term as opposed to defining themselves, for the reality is that the term n**ga is simply ghetto vernacular for n**ger, obviously there ISN’T any difference between the two.

h-lewis-smith H. Lewis Smith is the founder and president of UVCC, the United Voices for a Common Cause, Inc., http://www.theunitedvoices.com author of Bury that Sucka: A Scandalous Love Affair with the N-Word, and the recently released book Undressing the N-word: Revealing the Naked Truth, Lies, Deceit and Mind Games https://www.createspace.com/4655015

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The NFL’s Proposal to Penalize Use of the N-word

Posted in African Americans, Black Interests, Black Men, Black Men In America, Racism with tags , , , , , on March 6, 2014 by Gary Johnson

Fritz-Pollard-Alliance

By H. Lewis Smith

Last season, Washington Redskins’ tackle Trent Williams was accused of directing use of the N-word toward a referee during a nationally-televised game. His action is just one of the many instances that the term tends to be thrown around freely in the face of self-respecting Black/African-American sports fans and America on the whole. In attempts to combat this blatant and far-reaching disrespect, in March 2014, the NFL Competition Committee will convene to consider instituting an automatic 15-yard penalty for on-field use of the N-word, with a second infraction resulting in ejection from the game. This ambitious, respected, and well-intended effort will be led by Mr. John Wooten, Chairman of the Fritz Pollard Alliance; the alliance monitors and promotes diversity in the NFL, and advocates for completely eliminating use of the word in the league.

The naysayers, proponents of the n-word, “puppets” and elites that work day and night to maintain the systemic are going to have a field day with this one. Even in light of this possible heckling, it’s refreshing to see a black organization initiating this pursuit and actively working to restore ethical, moral and civil principles and values in the collective society. Such demanding of self-respect within and without the Black community is a matter that should have been undertaken arbitrarily by the Black community years ago. Although the alliance’s efforts are applauded and great admiration is paid to see someone willing to stand up against the racial indignities, personally, the gravest concern and bewilderment is that such an act even needs to be suggested in the first place. Why is it that a group of people need to have rules, regulations and laws in place to protect them from themselves? Why have individual African Americans failed to be accountable to self on a morally-enriched level and demonstrate that they are more than capable of policing self?

This time last year, United Voices for a Common Cause (UVCC) which is a black non-profit organization that promotes societal progress and anti-n-word use, at least approached the NBA to turn their attention to and take some sort of intervening action regarding NBA players’ open, uninhibited use of the vulgar term. UVCC and any other self-respecting Black/African American knows that there is ABSOLUTELY nothing endearing or accepting about the term; only a mentally-enslaved sycophant is going to be fool enough to expend any amount of energy into attempting to transform the term or approve of its use in any light. Hopefully, The Fritz Pollard Alliance’s efforts are a sign that the Black community is finally willing to stand up and take back its self-respect, dignity, pride and honor from elements in the community who are all too willing to trample on and disgrace the sacred and hallowed memories of their beloved ancestors by using the n-word in any fashion. To consider embracing the n-word as symbolic of the Black culture—and especially as a synonym in reference to a black man—is outrageous, contemptible and unacceptable.

John Wooten

Several years ago, Damon Wayans applied to trademark the name n**ger so he could use the name for a clothing line. The system magnanimously denied the request in a seeming effort of, once again, saving the Black community from itself. Though a minute section of people in the Black community were appalled at Damon’s request, the majority of the community was unmoved as they generally are when it comes to internal usage of the n-word. Thankfully the trademark was not approved, however, for entertainment purposes, consider the opposite effects of such a trademark: if it were able to be trademarked, it would have potentially limited use of the term at least in mainstream media as before the term could be used, one would have to obtain permission to use it. The systemic realizes that if the word is “seen” less, it may become one of those “out of sight, out of mind” situations; ultimately, this may result in Black Americans no longer associating with and living as the n-word, and eventually rising to their true “place” in society. At any rate, the systemic’s purpose is to keep Black America in its man-made position. The larger question is when will Black America realize this plight being played against them, and stop voluntarily falling in line with such a sad affair?

Many pro athletes, be it football or basketball, refer to one another as the n-word (n**ga) just as naturally as breathing the Almighty’s clean air. It must be pointed out that not all African Americans disrespect themselves by assaulting and ravaging the memories of their ancestors through invoking the anathematized word into their vocabulary; however, far too many either use the term themselves and/or will, nonetheless, tolerate use of it by others in the community and even some outside the community—this is mental weakness unencumbered.

Any attempts of dealing with n-word usage by the black community is always met with a chorus of people believing there are more important, prevalent issues to which the community’s attention should be turned. In so many words, these people are saying that use of the n-word by Black African Americans is off limits and untouchable. It matters not if one is an elementary school student, drop-out, college graduate or PhD holder, the sentiments are generally the same; proponents of the n-word say turn a blind eye to the term—or, table or completely disregard any types of effects the terms manifests upon the Black psyche—and do not disturb them and their use of the n-word.  They would much rather go through hell wearing gasoline underwear than let go of their 18th century slave mentality use of the n-word (n**ger/n**ga). They simply do not have the mental strength to live without it, and this is the crux of the entire matter: Black America refuses to face up to why the community is so captivated by use of a word that dehumanized and still dehumanizes their enslaved ancestors and selves.

From slavery to the present, Black African Americans have undeniably borne an unprecedented amount of suffering and mental abuse. Their insistence upon embracing the n-word (n**ga), and refusal to correct the matter, serves as confirmation that the chains to mental enslavement were never broken. The inability to break the chain and experience true mental liberation—which is available and free for the taking—make Black America its own worst enemy. Thus, to be saved from themselves, actions must be taken by other individuals—whether they are within or outside of the community—to police African Americans; this unfortunate scenario is presently demonstrated with the case of the NFL and The Fritz Pollard Alliance pending proposal.

Should there be any red-blooded, self-respecting Black African Americans reading this commentary who are fed up with the asinine use of the n-word and conduct unbecoming that of proud, honorable, dignified people, please share your feelings and concerns with UVCC at admin@theunitedvoices.com. UVCC will respond to your inquiries and offer useful insight as to effective actions that can be taken to once and for all cure the Black community of its most deep-rooted and far-reaching problem: the inferior mentality watered by use of the n-word.

h-lewis-smith H. Lewis Smith is the founder and president of UVCC, the United Voices for a Common Cause, Inc. (www.theunitedvoices.com); authors of “Bury that Sucka: A Scandalous Love Affair with the N-Word”, and “Undressing the N-word: Revealing the Naked Truth About Lies, Deceit and Mind Games” https://www.amazon.com/author/hlewissmith

Follow him on Twitter: www.twitter.com/thescoop1

Undressing the N-word, Revealing the Naked Truth About Lies, Deceit and Mind Games

Posted in African Americans, Black America, Black Interests, Black Men, Black Men In America with tags , on February 9, 2014 by Gary Johnson

NWord Book Cover

Los Angeles, CA. February 10, 2014 — Undressing the N-word depicts the state of sociological views regarding questions that have been on people’s minds for years but have been considered too sensitive to talk about openly. Among these types of taboo-type discussions is one that analyzes the systemic psychological warfare and psychosocial treatment of one group over another. The systemic subjects the oppressed group to seeing, through a controlled national media, only the worst in themselves. Undressing the N-word reveals and ties together how such socially-engineered behavior brings about and correlates to crime, unemployment, welfare, child neglect, drugs, and poverty; further, the text brings to light what policy can—and cannot—do to compensate for differences in social stratification and economic disparity. Brilliantly argued and meticulously presented, Undressing the N-word is the essential first step in coming to grips with the nation’s social problems.

An aged yet completely relevant adage so goes: “Capture their minds, and their hearts and souls will follow. For once their minds are reached, they’re defeated without bullets.” This truth epitomizes the plight of the African-American community.  Breaking new ground and old taboos, H. Lewis Smith presents critical analysis as to how the 21st century modern system of psychological manipulation is so enthralling and sophisticated that it misleads many Blacks into believing that their embracing of the pejorative n-word is a normal and natural, ineffectual act.

In 1863, the Proclamation of Emancipation was signed, supposedly freeing the American slaves, but it was almost a century later before the law was fully enacted.  Accordingly, Smith argues that a man is not truly free until the shackles of the human mind, body and spirit are broken; until one is capable of taking control of their own mind and thoughts, he is still a slave.  Thinking, living and embracing an image that was long ago instilled in him, an image that holds him hostage to a dastardly past, the n-word, is not the mindset of a truly free, mentally-liberated person. Thus, Smith’s observations and resolve is solely focused on Black America’s use of the term and no one else.  Black America must become accountable and concerned about their own ultimate outcome. Smith maintains that a race either rises on its own wings, or is held down by its own weight.

In this ground-breaking book, H. Lewis Smith also traces and examines the development and indoctrination of how a race of people were conditioned and programmed to despise their own history and culture by their oppressor, as well aselaborate on how real equality and societal progression can be achieved.

Undressing the N-word will be available online Friday, February 14, 2014, paperback, ISBN 978-0-615-96242-9, $19.95 at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble; eBook copies will be available Monday, February,17th at https://www.createspace.com/4655015 .  Orders are now being accepted at admin@theunitedvoices.com.

h-lewis-smith H. Lewis Smith is the Founder and President of UVCC, the United Voices for a Common Cause, Inc. (http://www.theunitedvoices.com);  and author of Bury that Sucka: A Scandalous Love Affair with the N-Word.”  You can follow Mr. Smith on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thescoop1.

Undressing the N-word

Posted in African Americans, Black America, Black Interests, Black Men, Black Men In America, Guest Columnists with tags , , , , on December 5, 2013 by Gary Johnson

H. Lewis Smith By H. Lewis Smith

Over the past year or so, many events have been occurring in the Black Community at the hand of the Black Community that continues to bring continual shame and degradation to the honorable memories, sacred struggle and sacrifice of African-American ascendants. Some may argue against it, but these acts continue to adversely affect the growth, development, and progression of the Black community, on a whole, to this very day. For instance, in November 2013, former NBA greats Charles Barkley, Shaquille O’Neal and ESPN commentator Michael Wilborn bowed down to and pledged their allegiance to a word that dehumanized, stigmatized and objectified their ancestors on national TV. That word is the n-word (n**ga).

It is this sort of pervasive 18th century slave mentality, blindness to such behaviors, and misuse of influential power– much-made possible by the blood and sacrifices of their own ancestors, that prompted writing the book “Undressing of the N-word: Revealing the Naked Truth About Lies, Deceit and Mind Games.” It is high time that Black America stop the antics, halt the selfish mentality of “I got mines”, and really use all resources they have to demand respect for the entire race within and without the community. Ignorance is no longer acceptable or the calling card to bring attention to Black America; rather, Black America must take the time to educate themselves, and in so doing, reality will be made clear.

The following are excerpts from one of the chapters in my soon-to-be released book entitled; “Undressing The N-word: Revealing the Naked Truth About Lies, Deceit and Mind Games.”

Forbiddingly, you learn today that your mother was brutally and unmercifully bludgeoned to death with a hammer. Now close your eyes and think about this for a moment: think about the heinousness in the act; see your mother screaming for her life and doing everything in her power to defend against and fight off her unrelenting attackers; think about all of the pain and anguish she endured as blow upon blow of the hammer welled down on her, before the final bit of life was unrightfully snatched with that last thud. Can you see it? Can you see the multiple plugs imprinted into whatever part of her body the hammer unforgivingly fell upon? Can you empathize with that dreadful moment in time?

Now ask yourself this: in order to memorialize your mother’s life and honor her sacred and beautiful memory, would you start using a hammer as a symbol or in remembrance of your mother? Of course not! To the contrary, every time you saw a hammer, it would likely stir up strong feelings of sadness, disgust, and, perhaps, even anger. The hammer would symbolize the bashing murder of your mom and, because of this association, you would elect to never disgrace her memory or embrace the cruel acts carried out against her by adopting the hammer as a symbol of the love and respect you possess for your mother. As a matter of fact, even if her murder occurred over 50 years ago, your feelings would not change and no one could convince you that a hammer is just a tool that carries no real power; rather, because of your experience, you would always view it as a weapon that unjustly ripped away a core part of who you are and someone that was most significant in your world.

In parallel to the previous analogy, replace the hammer with the term n**ger”; replace the mother figure with Black/African-American ancestors and present time Black America. The word n**ger (or n**ga or n**gah in ghetto vernacular) symbolizes death, terrorism and dehumanization in the lives of untold millions of Black people. Men, women, AND children were butchered, slaughtered, severely beaten unmercifully, raped, disemboweled, and castrated all because they were considered valueless n**gers. They were murdered with the chant of “n**ger, n**ger, n**ger” ringing in their ears as they drew their last breath. Racial slurs such as coon, jungle bunny, sambo, Uncle Tom, jigaboo, or porch monkey didn’t trigger mayhem, terror and death into the lives of Black African-American ancestors; instead, it was ONE word and ONE word only: n**ger. The n-word is the most infamous and profane word in the English language. The origin, definition, and acts carried out under the guise of the term fueled the African-American Holocaust—a holocaust that, sadly, has been sanitized by American historians.

I’m an American, not African-American is often times an argument advanced by many of those lost ones who have chosen to walk in identity blindness, trying hard to fit in or align with a culture not their own. Hispanics have no problem identifying with their culture, Jewish people relate to their culture, Asians to theirs, Arabs to theirs, and so on. However, some Black Americans desire no part of identifying as an African descendant because they feel some sort of shame in being associated to Africa. It matters not if your black heritage is linked to Haiti, Jamaica, West Indies, Caribbean, or India; ultimately, all roads somewhere down the line lead back to Africa, the Motherland. Everyone with a color-filled complexion has some connection to Africa; and if one chooses to learn of their past and origins, he/she will find that their truest history is indeed a remarkable marvel in which to be proud and one from which they should be more than thankful to have been born.

Black people are the only people on the face of this earth who have been detached and separated from their ancient history and culture. Their acceptance of being defined as the n-word is not the mindset of a free people. Ironically, some black people will reject the notion of being referred to as an African but will embrace the n-word without hesitation, and will fight to defend their freedom of speech to use the pejorative word.

Is it racist to refer to self as “African-American” or to celebrate Kwanzaa? Some see the celebration of Kwanzaa as a racist act. Some propose that blacks should view themselves as Americans rather than African-Americans, and, thus, should have no separate holiday. Some promote rejecting the holiday completely, using the justification that blacks would protest a white racist if they created a holiday to celebrate whiteness.

Perhaps, people should conduct their due diligence and research the origin of Christmas, Easter, Thanksgiving, Halloween and even the Christian religion itself which serves as an advocacy for White Supremacy. Ironically, the ethnocentrism celebrations of Cinco de Mayo (Hispanic and Latino), as well as Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur, and Chanukah, just a few of the numerous Jewish holidays, are not considered racism. However, any attempt by Black African-Americans to introduce, acknowledge or celebrate any form of African culture is considered racist and taboo. Black African-Americans need to stop living within the confined boundaries of the 400-year-old anesthesia and start paying attention.

Acknowledging Kwanzaa would be one of the right steps to take in helping Black African- Americans re-establish their identities—unless of course Blacks choose to remain ashamed of being black as the indoctrination process was set in place to accomplish. Thriving black civilizations maintain dates of existence to well before the Aztecs, Mayans, Greeks and Romans even came into the picture. High time has come for Black America to take back the strong cultural identity that was stolen and contorted into some dishonorable, foul worthless sense of being. Black America must stop acting victimized and no longer remain powerless to an on-going 400-year-old mind control game.

Some may have a problem with Kwanzaa’s founder Professor Maulana “Ron” Karenga and, perhaps, these concerns do not go unfounded. However, one should not lose the spirit, meaning, and intent of the holiday based on popular opinion of its founder. As well, before one chooses to immediately cast away any credibility in the holiday and founder, lest not forget that America itself initially consisted of England’s undesirables, crooks, murderers and thieves; they were shipped to America because there was no hope of their rehabilitation. Now, America is the greatest country on earth, many thanks of course to the sweat, blood and tears of African enslaved ancestors.

Black America must not jump on the train of continual sabotage; rather, Black America must find the good in efforts such as Kwanzaa to use as a tool in re-gaining the much-needed collective self-awareness.

Many opponents of Kwanzaa reject the holiday and question its significance, but will openly accept and embrace the n-word without question—even while well-knowing the history of the n-word. How preposterous is that? A word connected to the mutilating, butchering and slaughtering of countless millions of black ancestors is used with no end by those same ancestors’ black descendants. Regardless to its newness or past life of its founder, for the liberated mind, accepting Kwanzaa as a “real” holiday should be a no-brainer, and realized as a step in the direction of black unity, liberation, and progression.

The book “Undressing The N-word: Revealing the Naked Truth About Lies, Deceit and Mind Games,” will be available in book stores nation-wide and in eBook versions shortly after the first of 2014.  Also, to learn more about UVCC and its mission, visit  http://www.theunitedvoices.com/.  H. Lewis Smith is the founder and president of UVCC, the United Voices for a Common Cause, Inc. (www.theunitedvoices.com); and author of “Bury that Sucka: A Scandalous Love Affair with the N-Word“. Follow H. Lewis Smith on Twitter: www.twitter.com/thescoop1

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