Dr. Fredrick Clark Introduces $50.00 A Year Dental Plan

Posted in African Americans, Black America, Black Interests, Health & Fitness with tags , , on April 20, 2014 by Black Man

Laughing Couple

Dr. Fredrick Clark is making it possible for anyone to have access to high quality dental care at an affordable price.  Who is Dr. Clark?  Dr. Fredrick Clark is a Washington, DC area (Oxon Hill, MD) dentist who has dedicated his professional life providing affordable dental care to patients who cannot afford dental insurance and to patients who suffer from an array of dental diseases.

Don’t have dental insurance?  Do you have poor coverage with your current dental plan?  Dr. Clark is going to make you an offer that you can’t refuse.  Sign up for Dr. Fredrick Clark’s $50.00 a YEAR Dental Plan! 

Say What?  You read that correctly.  A $50.00 a YEAR Dental Plan.

What’s the catch?  There is no catch!  This is the Real Deal!

How about a $50.00 cleaning or a $50.00 filling or even a $50.00 extraction?

Surprised Woman Smiling

Well it’s true.  Tell your friends.  The days of “OVERPRICED” dental care are over!  Now you can afford to see a dentist in your community.  If you live in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, call the office of Dr. Fredrick Clark at 301-686-1070 to sign up for the $50.00 a YEAR Dental Plan!  Se Habla Espanol.

About Fredrick Clark, DDS

Dr. Clark Dr. Fredrick Clark, DDS is a graduate of Howard University Dental School.  Dr. Clark has been a dentist for over 28 years.  He prides himself in providing dental care for children and adults who suffer from physical and mental challenges that prevent them from being treated in a normal dental setting.  Dr. Clark has received numerous awards and commendations from State and Federal officials for his work with children.  Long considered one of the best and brightest dentists in the region, Dr. Clark is often called to assist legislators shape dental public policy.

The Life and Times of Kibrom “Bags” Endirias

Posted in African Americans, Black America, Black Interests, Women's Interests with tags , on April 16, 2014 by Black Man

The African Rapper Shares a Personal Story on Pain, Passion and the Pursuit of Happiness

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Being a true African American man raised in Decatur to East African parents, I’ve had quite a unique life experience. I was the only child out of my 5 siblings to be born in the US after my family fled Eritrea during a time of civil unrest. My parents risked all of our lives in order for us to live our lives. In addition to those complexities, my dad was a missionary who began the first Eritrean church in Atlanta. As a result, I spent the majority of my formative childhood and early teenage years in church: church meetings, Bible study, prayer groups, revivals, spring break and summer break. Even when I wasn’t physically at the house of worship, I still lived in a house of worship. We weren’t allowed to listen to secular music at home, but as we got older I’d sneak in my brother’s car to listen to Eminem or Jay Z or Bob Marley.

Being at school became my only outlet for a taste of real life because I was around kids who lived differently than I did and with that came curiosity on both ends. I wanted to know what it was like to act up, while my classmates put me to the challenge. They would dare me, the preacher’s kid, to curse or behave in ways contrary to what I was taught. For a long time I resisted the negative pull but over time that struggle between good and evil wore me down. I started indulging in my passion for music, especially rap, although I’d always been a lover of music. My mother has a beautiful singing voice, my older brother plays the piano and I sang in the church choir, a gift that continues to serve me well in my career. My new lifestyle created a different kind of war my family couldn’t escape from. I started getting into a little bit of trouble, which pushed me to write more and really pour my soul into my music. The whole time this was happening, I was fighting my own personal battle of having the support of my homeboys who came to every show I did, yet my family didn’t believe in me. I understood and respected my parent’s sacrifice to give my siblings and I a chance at a quality life. I know they didn’t go through all that strife just to have their child be a rapper. They didn’t understand the promises placed inside of me. They wanted me to go to college, get a good job, get married, raise a nice family but I had my own vision. It’s been hard to put your all into something you love and not have the encouragement of the people you love. As the years pass, they’re coming to terms with my decision to rap because they realize that music is all I want to do.

I got the name Bags because I can rhyme at any pace, speak on any subject you can think of, which is like my secret weapon, my bag of tricks. You never know what you’ll get when I drop a track. I think because I did so much of the initial groundwork in the early stage of my career like shooting my own videos, creating my own beats, singing my own hooks that I subsequently became an even doper artist. To make a point to this article, I want to encourage other young guys to be steadfast in their dreams, respect your family but also respect the talents that God placed inside of you that other people may not fully recognize just yet. Be your own team and fan club because at the end of the day you have to believe in yourself before anyone else will join you on your journey. And no matter what, keep your integrity. My faith is still strong inside of me, which is why there’s no check big enough to make me not put out music that doesn’t matter or have the ability to touch a soul.

TamikoHope4-1-201x300 This article courtesy of Tamiko Hope.  Miko got her start in the world of entertainment as a college intern at LaFace Records in Atlanta, Georgia.  She went on to work for Usher and Goodie Mob before launching her own PR and editorial firm Word Ink.  Hope has been an integral part of the growing success of southern artists, spearheading national PR campaigns for Grammy award winning artists, producers and DJs.  Her clientele has included OutKast, Rocko, Shawty Lo, DJ Toomp, Zaytoven, Sonny Digital, Metroboomin, DJ Spinz, Que, DJ Scream and DJ Princess Cut, whom she also manages.  Hope was born in Atlanta, GA and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mass Communications with an emphasis in Public Relations from the State University of West Georgia.  She is the author of the e-book The Industry Insider: 10 Key Facts from Music Industry Insiders.  In addition to PR and writing, Hope is also a public speaker in the realms of entertainment and youth empowerment, particularly young women.

Click here to learn more about Tamiko Hope.

Book Review — Black and White: The Way I See It by Richard Williams

Posted in African Americans, Black Interests, Black Men, Sports News with tags , , , , on April 14, 2014 by Black Man

Richard Williams

By Gary A. Johnson

Tennis coach Richard Williams is a controversial figure in women’s tennis.  I read his new book, “Black and White:  The Way I See It,” on a plane ride to Vermont.  I could not put the book down.  I don’t play tennis and typically don’t follow it with the exception of Venus and Serena Williams.  Raised in Compton, California, Venus and Serena Williams with the coaching of their father have dominated women’s tennis for over a decade.  Between them, they have won 15 Wimbledon titles, won more Olympic gold medals than any other women in tennis, each been repeatedly named the No. 1 female player in the world and earned almost every major award in the sport.  Behind their success stands Richard Williams, their father and tennis coach.

Through unorthodox methods and amid constant criticism, Richard Williams had a grand plan for his daughters.  In this inspiring memoir, Black and White: The Way I See It,” Williams, for the first time ever, shares stories about the poverty and violence of his early life in Shreveport, Louisiana, in the 1940s.  Richard Williams used a unique parenting style as a coach and as a parent.  He taught his girls how to think and he was not a super coach who acted like a tyrant.  He would pull his girls from tournaments when he thought it was more important that they enjoy the childhood.At the end of the day, Richard Williams overcame major obstacles as a child, raised a loving family as an adult, and along the way, developed two of the greatest tennis players who ever lived.

 

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books (May 6, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1476704201
  • ISBN-13: 978-1476704203

 

The John Lewis Music Experience

Posted in Black Men, Black Men In America, Events and Annoucements, Music with tags , on April 13, 2014 by Black Man

John Lewis

By Gary A. Johnson

The foundation of the J. Lewis musical experience starts with guitarist and vocalist John G. Lewis.  John has developed a unique and innovative sound and style of guitar playing which integrates guitar and synthesizer; allowing him to create unbelievably rich musical orchestrations. Combining his silky smooth voice and his linguistic prowess, he has assembled an intriguing repertoire of Jazz, R&B, and Brazilian grooves, which he performs in English, French, and Portuguese.For as much as John is passionate about the performance, John is a perfectionist about the fidelity of the sound and acoustic impact of the music.  John recently played at a function for our family and friends and won a new group of fans who had never experienced his unique style of music.  Click here to visit John’s official website and sample the J. Lewis music experience from his latest CD.

Uncle Earl

Posted in African Americans, Black America, Black Men, Politics with tags on April 13, 2014 by Black Man

jeffrey-thompson

By William Reed

The legend of “Uncle Earl” is a lesson in Black urban politics. Businessman Jeffrey Earl Thompson is one of Washington D.C.’s “most influential Blacks.” The 58-year-old Thompson was proven to be “Uncle Earl” in court proceedings that revealed secret dealings that broke a whole host of campaign finance laws, including funneling more than $2 million to various candidates through third parties and off-the-record activities.

Thompson is the most prolific political rainmaker in the nation. Thompson allegedly gave more than $600,000 to make Vincent Gray’s campaign to unseat Adrian Fenty in the 2010 D.C. mayoral election successful. Thompson funneled more than $3.3 million in unreported donations to at least 28 local and national candidates and their campaigns beginning in 2006. The recent “guilty” plea that Thompson entered to federal conspiracy charges marks a defining moment for the self-made, immigrant businessman, who built an accounting and health care empire that gained fame and fortune.

Few Black Americans can claim credit for designing, developing and propagating a $633,000 urban shadow electoral campaign. The federal court proved that Thompson was a kingmaker who delivered hundreds of thousands of dollars in illegal “straw donor” campaign contributions to sway elections in the city and beyond. Election after election, the Jamaican-born Thompson huddled behind closed doors with candidates, political operatives, and businessmen, to devise schemes to funnel millions of dollars of corporate money into local and federal elections.

Thompson’s reach extended to Maryland’s governments and officials. A mover and shaker without peer, Thompson was schooled well in the art of politics. He solicited relatives, friends, employees and others to make donations to designated candidates and reimbursed their “conduit contributions” with personal money and money from his companies. On his company’s books, the payments were listed as “advances” and “bonuses.” Thompson’s company also paid for in-kind gifts to candidates that included $653,000 in money for the 2010 Mayoral Campaign in D.C. and $608,750 to the 2008 Hillary Clinton candidacy for president.

Many immigrants from the West Indies and African countries often far outperform American-born Blacks in business and politics. Jeffrey Earl Thompson was born in 1955 into a working-class home in Jamaica’s St. Elizabeth Parish, the youngest of 11 children. He came to Washington in 1975, earning a high school equivalency degree and putting himself through the University of the District of Columbia by working as a bookkeeper. Not long after graduating from college and interning at top accounting firms, in 1983 he founded his own company, which would become Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio & Associates. Thompson built the firm into a $300 million enterprise. Over the next two decades, he would build it into a national powerhouse among minority-owned firms, because of its ability to win local and federal government contracts. He would go on to own D.C. Chartered Health Plan, a health care firm that managed services for 100,000 residents.

By most measures Thompson would be labeled “an American success story.” So, while a number of his political cohorts are serving prison time, most Washingtonians expect that Thompson’s sentence will be reduced to six months of home confinement. Thompson moved among the highest levels of Blacks and politics in D.C. He paid $608, 750 through former White House aide Minyon Moore to hire “street teams” in four states to help boost Clinton’s campaign for the 2008 Democratic nomination.

Thompson is an important man of the times. The “shout out” he received from President Bill Clinton at the podium of a 1997 Democratic National Committee dinner at the Sheraton-Carlton Hotel attests to the reach Thompson attained as he moved between City Hall and the White House. As he became “a donor of note” to D.C. and national political campaigns, Thompson cultivated close relationships with national figures, including Civil Rights icon Dorothy I. Height and former Labor Secretary Alexis Herman. Height gave Thompson instant status. Thompson met Herman through Height when the two paid an ill Height a visit. Thompson offered Herman a ride, which turned into dinner and eventually romance. Thompson escorted Herman to the 1994 state dinner for Nelson Mandela.

William Reed William Reed is publisher of “Who’s Who in Black Corporate America” and available for projects via the BaileyGroup.org

MARCH MADNESS: Dr. Leo Hill–Willie Jones–Dick Heller

Posted in Sports News with tags , on March 29, 2014 by Black Man

Harold Bell

By Harold Bell

WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE?
IN DC THERE WAS ELGIN BAYLOR and WILLIE AND EVERYONE ELSE FOLLOWED

Dr. Leo Hill, Willie Jones and Dick Heller, the common denominator, they were all DC Institutions and were Superstars in the Game Called Life. They touched hundreds of lives in the DMV and beyond. I owe each one dearly for my success in the community and in sports media. They loved me in spite of myself.

Dr. Hill’s coaching career began at Spingarn in 1952 where he taught and coached for 10 years. During this span of time Dr. Hill coached 9 championship teams: One in football in 1954, 2 in baseball in 1953 and 1957 and 6 cross country team championships from 1955 to 1960. He taught me that the most important game being played in the world today was not football, basketball or baseball, it was the game called life. It was the only game being played where being called a Super Star had real meaning. In my early years as an athlete at Spingarn High School in Washington, DC I was a mess and trying my best to go to hell in a hurry.

My savior Coach Dave Brown allowed me to dress for the DC Public High School football Championship game against Cardozo High School at Griffin Stadium in 1955 (freshman) but I never left the bench. Poor grades and bad attitude were the deciding factors and two 6’5 wide receivers by the names of Dickie Wells and Charles Branch. I could barely see over the line of scrimmage but I could catch a football. Spingarn played Cardozo in the championship game and we tied 0-0.  The game was decided on a rule called Penetration. The rule states, “The team that crosses the other’s 50 yard line more frequently is the winner.” Cardozo was declared the winner.

When I finally got some decent grades I went out for the baseball team in my junior year. I made the team and earned the starting position in left field for a talented team that had promise. For some odd reason I thought I was the Willie Mays of high school baseball. Dr. Hill watched me run from under my hat and make basket catches on routine fly balls, steal bases without permission and swing at pitches that he signaled for me to take. It all came to an abrupt end in a game against Fairmont Heights High School in Prince George’s County, Maryland.

It was a close game with Fairmont Heights leading 4-3 in the bottom of the 7th inning. I bunted my way on to first base with 2 outs. I would steal second base successfully without the go signal from Dr. Hill. He called time out and came on to the field of play. He reminded me that our best hitter Donald “Cornbread” Malloy was at bat. Before Dr. Hill could get back to the bench I had stolen 3rd base. I dared not look his way.

Donald stepped out of the batter’s box and just stared at me. He fouled off the next 2 pitches and the next pitch I took off to steal home—I was out by a mile game over.

I remember sitting in the Spingarn locker room when Dr. Hill walked quietly up to me and asked me to turn in my uniform. He reminded me that there was only one Willie Mays and he played in New York City. Spingarn would go on to earn the right to play Wilson for the DC Public High School Championship. The game would be played at Griffin Stadium home of Major League Baseball’s Washington Senators and where the Negro League Homestead Grays played their home games. It was a stadium I dreamed of playing in one day. Donald Malloy never let me forget that Spingarn lost 5-4 to Wilson. He reminded me years later that the player who replaced me in left field made 2 errors that cost Spingarn the championship.

My junior year was a tough one. Coach Brown locked me on the school bus during half-time of a game against rival Phelps because I needed an attitude adjustment. Basketball Coach Rev. William Roundtree gave me my walking papers my senior year. It looked like I was trying to make my Middle School Principal William Stinson’s prediction come true. He told my mother, “He won’t live to get out of high school.”
It took years but I finally learned the lesson that my coaches first tried to teach me. The lesson, no one is indispensable and baseball like the game called life is a team sport. Thanks Dr. Hill.

Willie Jones was “One of a Kind” in DC basketball history. There was Elgin Baylor and Willie and everyone else followed. Elgin was like poetry in motion on the court. He could rock you to sleep. Willie was like an AK47 (mouth almighty) on the court no time to sleep—he had everyone’s attention.

If he had a basketball he would travel. He was a winner at every level, playground, middle school, high school and college. If he had been given the opportunity he would excelled at the pro level.

As a coach in DC he was second only to the legendary Red Auerbach.  There are three coaches in the District/Maryland/Virginia (DMV) area who won National NCAA basketball titles, John Thompson, Gary Williams and Willie Jones.

Thompson and Williams were never in his class when it came to the Xs and Os of coaching basketball. Willie not only played the game at an extremely high level—he coached at an even higher level. He was a great recruiter because he had been there and done that. The young players loved him. He spoke their language (with many, many bleeps).

There have been many basketball discussions in pool rooms, on street corners, playgrounds, and the sports bars in DC. The topic: What if Willie had the talent that Big John had at Georgetown—how many championships would he have won? Every discussion I have heard it is unanimous, Willie would have won at least 3 National NCAA Championships.

The bottom–line, Georgetown is building a 60 million dollar sports complex on its campus in the name of John Thompson. This is a legitimate pay-off for putting them on the sports map and bringing in millions of dollars of revenue for the school and himself by any means necessary. The million-dollar question now is—can he save his son’s job?

Willie Jones put two universities on the basketball map, American University and UDC. But there will be no statures or sports complexes built in his name—which proves crime does pay.

What I will remember most about Willie is that he was flawed like most of us human beings but he was trust worthy to the point if he gave you his word you could carry it to the bank. He also took coaching seriously, especially when it came to his players. They were always first.
If you were a friend, he would go to war with you or for you. I am reminded of his co-worker the legendary athlete and coach Bessie Stockard when the UDC Administrators targeted her for dismissal from the school, it was Willie who went against the grain and testified on her behalf in court—she won.

He was like a brother to me. I could never stay mad at him. Whatever our difference of opinion, the next time we saw each other he would be joking and smiling like it never happen. A family member said it best, “You two where Kindred Spirits.” Thanks Willie.

Sports columnist Dick Heller was a class act. He was an officer and gentleman and a man of integrity. His word meant something unheard of in media today. He was a loyal friend and mentor to me for over two decades. Thanks to him I am still in the fight for truth in media and my eyes are still on the prize—our children. Dick was there for me and anyone else I supported. Especially, homegrown talent like Willie Wood (NFL), Earl Lloyd (NBA) and LA Dodger great Maury Wills.

Willie Wood was a benefactor after the NFL had blackballed him because he would not go along to get along during his NFL coaching days. There was some drug abuse by several NFL players on the team. He spoke out against the abuse and was not asked to return the next year. He was out of pro football for several years until the Canadian Football hired him as the first Afro-American Head Coach. Willie was voted one of the greatest defensive backs to ever play in the NFL. His coach, the great Vince Lombardi said, “Willie Wood is my coach on the field.” Still the powers-to-be shut him out of the NFL Hall of Fame. I went to Dick and brought him up to date. Willie was voted into the NFL Hall of Fame in 1989 two years after some timely stories appeared in sports media outlets (radio and print) spearheaded by Dick Heller.

Earl Lloyd was the first black to play in the NBA in 1950. He was from Alexandria, Virginia and played in the CIAA (BHC). He was overlooked for his contributions in the CIAA and NBA. I turned to Red Auerbach and Dick. They took charge and suddenly there was a story on Page One of the Washington Times talking about the trials and tribulations of Earl Lloyd’s early NBA days. The photo on the page showed Earl and Red in a forum at the Smithsonian during Black History Month. In 2001, over fifty years later Earl Lloyd was inducted into the NBA Hall of Fame.  Thanks Red Auerbach and Dick Heller.

Dick tried his best to help our homeboy Maury Wills get his just deserts. Maury revolutionized offense in Major League Baseball. He made an art out of the stolen base. He made the fans forget about the home run in the 60s. He was master of all he surveyed in ballparks around the country but his off the field antics of drugs and domestic abuse have been hard to ignore by the voters. He is still on the outside looking in as it relates to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Dick’s first love has always been baseball and he tried his best to get Maury inducted with a brilliantly written two page story in the Washington Times over a decade ago but “The Haters” have refused to budge. Dick, Maury never said thanks but I will.

Dick was not only a talented writer and editor but he was also a risk taker. He never sit on the fence to see whether it was safe to fall on one side or the other. He loved his hometown of DC and all of its sports teams but you could never mistake him for a cheerleader if the home team made a wrong move. He would take them to task. For example, in 1977 he exposed several Maryland University players for poor academic records during the watch of Charles Driesell, aka Lefty.

He gave the players and Lefty the kind of fame they could have done without. He published their names with photos and their academic records in the sports pages of the Washington Star. Talking about opening up a “Can of Worms.”

The university student newspaper, The Diamond Back followed Dick’s lead and published the player’s grade point average. Six players on the teams sued Dick, the Washington Star, and their own Diamond Back newspaper for invasion of privacy, publishing confidential university records and intentional infliction of emotional distress. The players sued for 72 million dollars in damages.  In 1979, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld a lower-court decision and ruled in the paper’s favor in the case known as Bilney vs. Evening Star.

The court ruled “The Players had achieved the status of public figures solely by virtue of their membership on the university basketball team. Therefore, their possible exclusion from the team—whether academic or any other reason was a matter of public concerned.”
The decision continued: “Having sought and basked in the limelight, by virtue of their membership on the team. Appellants (i.e., the players) will not be heard to complain when the light focused on them on their potential imminent withdrawal from the team.”
Bilney vs. Evening Star remains an important case in the first amendment law and has been cited in legal proceedings, in text books and courses taught in media law.

Tim Kurkjian ESPN broadcaster who started his media career at the Star said, “Dick was a kind of mentor to the younger guys, I cannot stress enough how helpful he was and how patient he was with us.”  Dick Heller was not only a mentor to younger guys during his long and distinguishing career in print media. He was also a mentor, friend and brother to Old Guys like me. I am a better writer today thanks to Dick Heller.

I look at the sports media sitting at press tables, media newsrooms, talk show host and analyst they are “The New Jack City Spooks That Sit by the Door” and have blocked the door extremely well. They see no evil, speak no evil, hear no evil and write no evil. All they care about is show me the money and “Look at me.”

Some even claim that it is okay to use the N word as a term of endearment. You would think that it would be names like Michael, James, Jason, Stephen, etc. leading the fight to right the wrongs of a Willie Wood, Earl Lloyd, Maury Wills and Spencer Haywood, but it was names like Dick, Rick Snider (Examiner) and Dave (McKenna, City Paper) kicking down the doors for other brothers of another color.

Coach Leo Hill, Willie Jones and Dick Heller—–we never could have made it without you (RIP).

This Ross Is The Boss Too!

Posted in African Americans, Black America, Black Interests, Gary A. Johnson, Music, Women's Interests with tags , , , , , on March 14, 2014 by Black Man

Rhonda Ross Pic

Rhonda Ross Logo

By Gary A. Johnson, Black Men In America.com

Last night, I had the pleasure of having front row seats to see singer Rhonda Ross perform at the Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club, located just across the Washington, DC line in Bethesda, MD.  I also met Ms. Ross after the show.  Rhonda Ross is the daughter of singing legend Diana Ross and Motown-Founder, Berry Gordy, Jr.  This Ms. Ross proved that she too can be the BOSS and in a very different kind of way. 

Rhonda Ross is a singer, songwriter, actress and writer.  One of the things I learned about Rhonda is that she is most proud of being a mother and co-parent with her husband of 15 years Rodney Kendrick.

Make no mistake, Rhonda Ross is NOT trying to be her mother.  She is carving out her own path and establishing her own musical identity.  Rhonda holds her mother in the highest regard–as a mother, but she is not trying to emulate Diana Ross the singer.  I’ve seen Diana Ross perform live and there are some similarities.  Rhonda Ross has stage presence like her mother.  When Rhonda stood center stage in that long flowing dress with her arms outstretched, she reminded me of Diana Ross.  That’s where the comparisons end.  Rhonda sings in a slightly lower register and has a stronger voice.

Rhonda Ross

I would describe Rhonda Ross’ as a Neo-Soul and jazz song stylist.  In my view, Rhonda Ross’ music is purposeful and inspiring, largely due to the fact that she writes a lot of her music.  Last night Rhonda spoke with the audience between songs.  It was clear to me that she is a spiritual and religious woman with a lot of inner strength.  When she sang the song “Nobody’s Business,” she explained that “your joy comes from the inside and that it’s nobody else’s job to make you happy.”

Ross’ live performance moved her and some in the audience to tears when she sang a song that she wrote that pays tribute to her mother.  Other songs were motivating and inspiring.  There were probably more women in the audience than men.  The Masters of Ceremony (MC) was Dr. Jeff Gardere aka “America’s Psychologist.”  Dr. Jeff reminded the men that we should take heed and listen to the lyrics too.

If you get a chance to see Rhonda Ross perform, do it!  Treat yourself to some nourishing and fulfilling entertainment.  To learn more about Rhonda Ross click here to visit her official website.

I would personally like to thank Miriam Machado-Luces of TVA Media Productions, Ltd and Elva Mason of Mason Management for the royal treatment afforded me.  Ladies you are the best!

I have one last and deserving shout out that goes to Rick Brown, the Proprietor of the Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club.  Rick you have done a great job.  Everything was great from start to finish including the Coat Check personnel, Wait Staff, Ushers, Bartenders and Chefs.  Your establishment is one of the best kept secrets in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.  I will be returning to your supper club soon.

Gary J. & Rhonda Ross

Gary Johnson and Rhonda Ross after the show.

Gary A. Johnson is the Founder & Publisher of Black Men In America.com a popular online magazine on the Internet and the Black Men In America.com Blog.  Gary is also the author of the book “25 Things That Really Matter In Life.To learn more about Gary click here.

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