Archive for February, 2014

Humanistic Inclusion

Posted in African Americans, Black Interests, Black Men, Black Men In America, Diversity, Fatherhood, Women's Interests with tags , , , on February 25, 2014 by Gary Johnson

   chakras

Humanistic Inclusion is a social science technology developed by Dr. Jerry “Doc” Semper that promotes “Man,” always be appropriately kind to all persons as much as circumstances permit.  Humans should welcome with sincere appreciation all others of the human species, unless circumstances require otherwise. Our default towards others should be to Trust, and have appropriate Manners, as our way of being.


Improving Family Interactions

Speak kind loving words, as much as possible. Be about promoting harmony with family members as often as possible. Hugs, and kisses are needed; even the “mob”, does it. Many citizens of other countries and religions conduct their everyday lives, by including hugs, and kisses; as signs of affection and caring.

Everything is not for everyone, including Dr. Spock. Some of the things espoused are not appropriate to several groups of young people. The method used by Spock is more effective with groups that view the world and events as Spock did. As parents values and conditions “line up”, with those as explained by Spock, then the methodology becomes far more achievable.   Not being in line with Spock creates implementation problems, using his approach. There is no one size fits all in child rearing, the best methods stem from caring, and doing the right thing, because it is the right thing.

Prying parents have a better chance of controlling, by asking questions, interest is shown, and an opportunity to influence is created. Properly executed an information-sharing bond will be created.   Having information in common may bring about closeness in family, through communication.

Learning to “out think” your children, by “coaching” them towards the directions you as a parent have chosen for them, is the best method for moving young people, positively. It is better to rule with “sincerity, and “cunning” rather then relying on fear and brute force; the later, requiring proximity, and communication; the former, effective whether near or far.

Mama_on_the_Grind

Teach life skills; those things necessary for a better life. Teach children how to determine “better”, as a gauge towards assessing present position. Teach that in order to get there, it is necessary to know the starting point.   Teach that style is just one aspect of our daily interactions, with both people known, and strangers Teach children to look for “sincerity of purpose”, especially when dealing with “authority figures”.   Teach that disagreeing with the “coach” may be appropriate, providing the understanding that the “coach” is.

A “ranking order” is necessary, and it should be known. Oftentimes, it isn’t discussed, except in anger. Temporary shifting of command is fine, however it must be understood, the structure remains ” intact, ” a seeming promotion that is temporary, based on current conditions.   Allowing a leadership role, for small tasks, creates a teachable moment, use it.   One way to learn, is to watch carefully   A better way is to be able, to watch, participate, and ask questions.

We should spend time teaching children, especially our own. When teaching children it is important to remember, who you were, at that age.  Those thoughts will provide a starting point for decisions; by giving a basis for actions.


Doc2 About Doc Semper

Jerry “Doc” Semper is an internationally known “Leadership Life Skills” training consultant and seminar leader for organizations and individuals seeking to improve in both productivity and harmony. He uses effective, practical principles developed from academic training, combined with hands-on involvement as a team member with police, military, and Fortune 500 corporations. A provider of specific programs for Youth and Families, for several national organizations; a Police Department trainer for well over 100 organizations; a trainer for Educators, and Government employees of several agencies; and a sought-after Corporate trainer for Fortune 200 companies. His programs receive widespread recognition for substance, and immediate results.

“Doc” is President of Semper Associates Coaching Academy.  He is a Vietnam era veteran, a Criminal Justice Professor, a former Acting Assistant U.S. Attorney, Minority Affairs Specialist for AARP, co-author of the National Community Oriented Police Curriculum, and a former decorated New York City Police Officer.

A former Senior Consultant for Skillpath Seminars. “Doc” infuses learning with motivation that causes participants to become pro-active. He is an excellent facilitator and trainer in all areas of human development.

“Doc” holds a Juris Doctorate from Howard University and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Fordham University.

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10 Things All Young Black Men Should Know

Posted in African Americans, Black Interests, Black Men, Black Men In America with tags , , , on February 12, 2014 by Gary Johnson

Morehouse

By The Black Star Project

1)     Know that you are a young Black man in America and that means you are different than other Americans.  While you can still realize your dreams, you might have to take a different path.  You will have to be more careful, more thoughtful and more aware than others to survive in America.

2)      Value education, learning and reading.  The more and better you can read for understanding, the freer and more powerful you will become.

3)      Work hard.  Many times, it is not what you know that makes you successful, but instead consistency, persistence, effort and dedication.  Be sure to just “show up”.

4)      Respect women and girls.  They hold up half the sky in our communities.  Together we can accomplish great things in our families and communities.

5)      Believe in something higher than yourself.  Whether its religious, spiritual or philosophical, connect with and explore the larger universe and eternity.

6)      Emulate strong, positive, intelligent Black men.  Use them as your mentors and role models.

7)      Be a leader!  Exhibit courage, wisdom, vision and good decision-making skills to help your community improve.  You are a natural leader.  Others will follow your positive and righteous actions.

8)      Respect and work with other young Black men to accomplish great things for your community.  Teams of young Black men can accomplish what individuals cannot.

9)      Study your history and culture.  You are not alone, ever.

10)    Choose positive peers, associates and friends.  Those relationships will help determine your path in life.

Black Star Project

As the Executive Director of The Black Star Project, Phillip Jackson has become a national leader advocating for community involvement in education and the importance of parental development to ensure that children are properly educated. The Black Star Project has served close to 100,000 students in over 175 schools since 1996 in its Student Motivation Program and between 3,000 to 4,000 parents in its parent outreach programs since 2004. This year, Phillip Jackson and The Black Star Project lead the nation back to school with the hugely successful Million Father March 2005. This second annual back-to-school march encouraged men to take children to school on the first day, marking a commitment to a year of positive male involvement in education. Marches took place at schools in 82 cities around the country and even in Auckland, New Zealand.

Undressing the N-word, Revealing the Naked Truth About Lies, Deceit and Mind Games

Posted in African Americans, Black America, Black Interests, Black Men, Black Men In America with tags , on February 9, 2014 by Gary Johnson

NWord Book Cover

Los Angeles, CA. February 10, 2014 — Undressing the N-word depicts the state of sociological views regarding questions that have been on people’s minds for years but have been considered too sensitive to talk about openly. Among these types of taboo-type discussions is one that analyzes the systemic psychological warfare and psychosocial treatment of one group over another. The systemic subjects the oppressed group to seeing, through a controlled national media, only the worst in themselves. Undressing the N-word reveals and ties together how such socially-engineered behavior brings about and correlates to crime, unemployment, welfare, child neglect, drugs, and poverty; further, the text brings to light what policy can—and cannot—do to compensate for differences in social stratification and economic disparity. Brilliantly argued and meticulously presented, Undressing the N-word is the essential first step in coming to grips with the nation’s social problems.

An aged yet completely relevant adage so goes: “Capture their minds, and their hearts and souls will follow. For once their minds are reached, they’re defeated without bullets.” This truth epitomizes the plight of the African-American community.  Breaking new ground and old taboos, H. Lewis Smith presents critical analysis as to how the 21st century modern system of psychological manipulation is so enthralling and sophisticated that it misleads many Blacks into believing that their embracing of the pejorative n-word is a normal and natural, ineffectual act.

In 1863, the Proclamation of Emancipation was signed, supposedly freeing the American slaves, but it was almost a century later before the law was fully enacted.  Accordingly, Smith argues that a man is not truly free until the shackles of the human mind, body and spirit are broken; until one is capable of taking control of their own mind and thoughts, he is still a slave.  Thinking, living and embracing an image that was long ago instilled in him, an image that holds him hostage to a dastardly past, the n-word, is not the mindset of a truly free, mentally-liberated person. Thus, Smith’s observations and resolve is solely focused on Black America’s use of the term and no one else.  Black America must become accountable and concerned about their own ultimate outcome. Smith maintains that a race either rises on its own wings, or is held down by its own weight.

In this ground-breaking book, H. Lewis Smith also traces and examines the development and indoctrination of how a race of people were conditioned and programmed to despise their own history and culture by their oppressor, as well aselaborate on how real equality and societal progression can be achieved.

Undressing the N-word will be available online Friday, February 14, 2014, paperback, ISBN 978-0-615-96242-9, $19.95 at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble; eBook copies will be available Monday, February,17th at https://www.createspace.com/4655015 .  Orders are now being accepted at admin@theunitedvoices.com.

h-lewis-smith H. Lewis Smith is the Founder and President of UVCC, the United Voices for a Common Cause, Inc. (http://www.theunitedvoices.com);  and author of Bury that Sucka: A Scandalous Love Affair with the N-Word.”  You can follow Mr. Smith on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thescoop1.

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